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Identifier Title Type Subject
White-tailed ptarmigan occupancy reportWhite-tailed ptarmigan occupancy reportTextWhite-tailed ptarmigan
<em>Lagopus leucura</em>
Endangered Species Act
Occupancy surveys
Type:Text
Subject:White-tailed ptarmigan
<em>Lagopus leucura</em>
Endangered Species Act
Occupancy surveys
Description:In 2010, the white-tailed ptarmigan (Lagopus leucura; WTPT) was petitioned to be listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The petitioners cited climate change and its impacts to a species dependent on alpine habitats as the main threat to the viability of WTPT populations. Colorado supports the largest population of WTPT in the lower 48 states. Thus, if the species does become listed, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) will be responsible for the bulk of the protection and management of the species, yet understanding of the species distribution and demographic parameters is limited.To develop a baseline distribution and inventory of the species, statewide occupancy surveys were conducted in 2011. These surveys will be used to respond to the petition to list the WTPT and to monitor populations as climate change and other disturbances impact the viability of the species over time. [show more]
Whirling disease researchWhirling disease researchTextWhirling disease
Fish
Trout
<em>Myxobolus cerebralis</em>
Fact sheet
Type:Text
Subject:Whirling disease
Fish
Trout
<em>Myxobolus cerebralis</em>
Fact sheet
Description:Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) has made whirling disease research a high priority for more than 20 years as part of the agency’s mission to conserve and perpetuate wildlife resources. When whirling disease first appeared in the state in the 1980s, CPW researchers started exhaustive projects to control the spread of whirling disease, limit the damage to fisheries and develop other solutions. The CPW work also includes cooperative investigations with researchers in other states to coordinate resources. [show more]
Where to look for toadsWhere to look for toadsTextToads
Type:Text
Subject:Toads
Description:A guide to locating toads
What should you do if wildlife gets too close to you and you get scared? Be S.M.A.R.T.What should you do if wildlife gets too close to you and you get scared? Be S.M.A.R.T.TextWildlife
Type:Text
Subject:Wildlife
Description:Colorado is home to many incredible wildlife species. As people and wildlife continue to share space, there is a chance that you, or a family member, will have a close encounter with one of Colorado’s predators. Please take the time to speak with your children, and other loved ones, about being S.M.A.R.T [show more]
WaTSS user manual: water temperature summary softwareWaTSS user manual: water temperature summary softwareTextWater temperature
WaTSS 3.0 (water temperature summary software)
Type:Text
Subject:Water temperature
WaTSS 3.0 (water temperature summary software)
Description:Water temperature is perhaps the single most important environmental parameter for fish (Magnusen et al. 1979). As ectothermic organisms, ambient temperature drives survival (Dickerson and Vinyard 1999, Bear et al. 2007, Underwood et al. 2012, Brinkman et al. 2013), behavior(Casselman 1978, Mesing and Wicker 1986, Cook and Bergersen 1988, Rogers 1998), growth (Selong et al. 2001, Meeuwig et al. 2004, Bear et al. 2007, Ziegler et al. 2013, Brinkman et al. 2013), and other physiological processes (Brett 1979), as well as defining the range a fish can occupy (Dunham et al. 2003, de la Hoz Franco and Budy 2005. Recent concerns over changing climactic conditions on fish (Ficke et al. 2007, Rahel and Olden 2007, Wenger et al. 2011, Peterson et al. 2013, Roberts et al. 2013) and its implications for persistence of threatened or endangered species has led to a proliferation of water temperature monitoring efforts (Isaak et al. 2012, Ziegler et al. 2013b). The combination of heightened interest coupled with the availability of relatively inexpensive and durable temperature loggers has precipitated an explosion in the use of these devices that has spread to applied uses in fish management as well, beyond just monitoring water quality. From detecting timing of fry emergence that inform water management practices to predicting optimum timing to implement successful wild spawn operations, use of these devices is becoming routine. While inexpensive remote temperature loggers have been available for several decades, interpreting the resulting data has been hampered by the lack of user friendly software. The hope is that this program can serve as a developing platform to make common analyses of temperature data readily available to managers and researchers alike. [show more]
Water for motorboatsWater for motorboatsTextBoating
Type:Text
Subject:Boating
Description:Colorado lakes and reservoirs where motorboats are allowed
Vocational Heavy Construction Technology program: a comprehensive plan including program needs and future directionsVocational Heavy Construction Technology program: a comprehensive plan including program needs and future directionsTextHabitat restoration
Colorado Department of Corrections
Type:Text
Subject:Habitat restoration
Colorado Department of Corrections
Description:In 1997 Warren Diesslin, former Warden of the Buena Vista Correctional Facility, and Eddie Kochman, former Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW) Aquatic Section Manager, met and discussed a joint venture to rehabilitate degraded stream habitats while providing heavy construction training for inmates sincere about changing the direction of their lives. These men conceived and supported the vision of what is now known as the Vocational Heavy Construction Technology (VHCT) program. Tom Bowen, once a prison guard and later a Colorado Department of Corrections (CDOC) vocational educational instructor with years of practical heavy construction experience, developed and coordinated this program with the support and approval of Warden Diesslin. Tom contacted the Colorado Contractors Association (CCA) and they agreed to serve as a program sponsor. The CCA has since become an integral part of the program, serving as the advisory board and assisting student inmates with job placement once they have successfully completed the program. Through the VHCT program, two state agencies (CDOW and CDOC) and private industry have formed a rare partnership with different missions: to help redirect human lives while restoring river natural processes and aquatic habitats within driving distance of the Buena Vista Correctional Facility. [show more]
Virtual Volunteer OrientationVirtual Volunteer Orientation
Description:CPW Main Website: https://cpw.state.co.us/ CPW Volunteer Website: https://cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Volunteers/Pages/default.aspx Volunteer Handbook: https://cpw.state.co.us/Documents/Volunteer/Handbook/CPW-Volunteer-Handbook.pdf Manual para Voluntarios: https://cpw.state.co.us/Documents/Volunteer/Handbook/CPW-Manual-para-Voluntarios.pdf [show more]
Variation in ungulate body fat Individual versus temporal effectsVariation in ungulate body fat Individual versus temporal effectsTextBody condition
Colorado
Ingesta-free body fat
Mule deer
<em>Odocoileus hemionus</em>
Variance components
Type:Text
Subject:Body condition
Colorado
Ingesta-free body fat
Mule deer
<em>Odocoileus hemionus</em>
Variance components
Description:The use of ultrasonograhic measurements of muscle and body fat represent a relatively new data stream that can be used to address questions regarding ungulate condition. We have learned that measurements of body fat and presumably overall body condition among individual animals, even those taken from the same herd at that same time, are highly variable. Relatively little consideration has been given to the sources of variation in body fat and other physiological parameters in wildlife populations. We evaluated the components of variation in late-winter mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) body fat estimates: sampling variation (i.e., variation induced by the particular set of individuals that were sampled) and process variation (i.e., variation stemming from biological processes) with a long-term data set (2002–2015) from Colorado, USA. We collected our data from across Colorado as part of historical research, ongoing research, and periodic population monitoring programs. Mean percent ingesta-free body fat (%IFBF) for sampled mule deer was 7.201.20% (SD). Covariates related to individual deer explained approximately 4% of the total variation in %IFBF and annual effects explained an additional 13% of the variation. Substantial residual variation in %IFBF (83%) remained unexplained. The source of the 83% of unexplained variation is partially linked to fine-scale spatial dynamics but also additional individual metrics we were unable to capture, primarily the presence or absence of dependent young. We speculate that the primary factors influencing late-winter mule deer body fat and overall condition are individual in nature. These results present a cautionary check on herdlevel inference that can bemade from individual late-winter body fat estimates and we postulate that for mule deer, alternative and additional body condition metrics may offer added utility in management scenarios. However, an important next step to better understand wildlife population health is to evaluate the sources and magnitude of variation within other body condition metrics, with the goal of further refining data that can better allow biologists to incorporate herd health into population management recommendations. [show more]
Using simulation to compare methods for estimating density from capture–recapture dataUsing simulation to compare methods for estimating density from capture–recapture dataTextClosure
Density
Geographic closure
Mean maximum distance moved
Simulation
Spatially explicit capture-recapture
Telemetry
Trapping grid
Type:Text
Subject:Closure
Density
Geographic closure
Mean maximum distance moved
Simulation
Spatially explicit capture-recapture
Telemetry
Trapping grid
Description:Estimation of animal density is fundamental to wildlife research and management, but estimation via mark–recapture is often complicated by lack of geographic closure of study sites. Contemporary methods for estimating density using mark–recapture data include (1) approximating the effective area sampled by an array of detectors based on the mean maximum distance moved (MMDM) by animals during the sampling session, (2) spatially explicit capture–recapture (SECR) methods that formulate the problem hierarchically with a process model for animal density and an observation model in which detection probability declines with distance from a detector, and (3) a telemetry estimator (TELEM) that uses auxiliary telemetry information to estimate the proportion of animals on the study site. We used simulation to compare relative performance (percent error) of these methods under all combinations of three levels of detection probability (0.2, 0.4, 0.6), three levels of occasions (5, 7, 10), and three levels of abundance (10, 20, 40 animals). We also tested each estimator using five different models for animal home ranges. TELEM performed best across most combinations of capture probabilities, sampling occasions, true densities, and home range configurations, and performance was unaffected by home range shape. SECR outperformed MMDM estimators in nearly all comparisons and may be preferable to TELEM at low capture probabilities, but performance varied with home range configuration. MMDM estimators exhibited substantial positive bias for most simulations, but performance improved for elongated or infinite home ranges. [show more]