339 items found
No search filters
Identifier Title Type Subject
A specialized forest carnivore navigates landscape-level disturbance: Canada lynx in spruce-beetle impacted forestsA specialized forest carnivore navigates landscape-level disturbance: Canada lynx in spruce-beetle impacted forestsTextDisturbance ecology
Forest carnivore
<em>Lynx canadensis</em>
Resource selection
Step-selection functions

Functional response
Forest insect
Spruce bark beetle
<em>Dendroctonus rufipennis</em>
Colorado
Type:Text
Subject:Disturbance ecology
Forest carnivore
<em>Lynx canadensis</em>
Resource selection
Step-selection functions

Functional response
Forest insect
Spruce bark beetle
<em>Dendroctonus rufipennis</em>
Colorado
Description:Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) occupy cold wet forests (boreal and subalpine forest) that were structured by natural disturbance processes for millennia. In the Southern Rocky Mountains, at the species’ southern range periphery, Canada lynx habitat has been recently impacted by large-scale disturbance from spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis). This disturbance poses a challenge for forest managers who must administer this novel landscape in ways that also facilitate timber salvage. To aid managers with this problem, we instrumented Canada lynx with GPS collars to document their selection of beetle impacted forests at spatial scales that spanned from landscapes to movement paths. We used a use-availability design based on remotely-sensed covariates to evaluate landscape- and path-level selection. We evaluated selection at the home-range scale in beetle-kill areas based on vegetation plots sampled in the field to quantify forest structure and composition. We found that across all scales of selection, Canada lynx selected forests with a higher proportion of beetle-kill trees that were generally larger in diameter than randomly available. Within home ranges, Canada lynx selected forests with greater live components of subalpine fir and live canopy of Engelmann spruce. During winter, Canada lynx exhibited functional responses, or disproportionate use relative to availability, for forest horizontal cover, diameter of beetle killed trees, live canopy of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa), and additive use (and consistent selection) for relative density of snowshoe hares and density of subcanopy subalpine fir 3–4.9 in. (7.6–12.4 cm) in diameter. We discuss our results in the context of balancing resource needs of Canada lynx with the desire to salvage timber in beetle-impacted forests. [show more]
Abert's squirrel coloring pageAbert's squirrel coloring pageTextAbert's squirrel
Tassel-eared squirrel
Education
Wildlife
Type:Text
Subject:Abert's squirrel
Tassel-eared squirrel
Education
Wildlife
Description:Coloring pages for Abert's squirrel
Adventures as a young naturalistAdventures as a young naturalistTextColorado
State parks
Education
Wildlife
Type:Text
Subject:Colorado
State parks
Education
Wildlife
Description:Come on an outdoor journey discovering Colorado’s state parks.
American dippers coloring pageAmerican dippers coloring pageTextAmerican dippers
Wildlife
Education
Type:Text
Subject:American dippers
Wildlife
Education
American pika (Ochotona princeps) 2015 monitoring surveyAmerican pika (<em>Ochotona princeps</em>) 2015 monitoring surveyText
American pika
<em>Ochotona princeps</em>
Endangered Species Act
Occupancy surveys
Population
Type:Text
Subject:American pika
<em>Ochotona princeps</em>
Endangered Species Act
Occupancy surveys
Population
Description:Concern about American pika (Ochotona princeps, pika) populations stemmed from limited research linking climate change to population extirpations in the Great Basin and Sierra Nevada Mountains (Beever et al. 2003, Moritz 2007). In October 2007, the pika was petitioned to be listed under the Endangered Species Act (Center for Biological Diversity 2007). A 12-month status review was completed in February 2010 with a finding of not warranted. Currently the pika is listed as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) in Colorado’s 2015 State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP). The single conservation action outlined in the SWAP to manage the species is the implementation of a long- term monitoring program to detect changes in distribution. It was emphasized in the SWAP that data collected during monitoring surveys should allow managers to correlate changes in distribution with vegetation, anthropogenic and/or weather stress parameters. [show more]
Anglers can help protect our rivers and streams from invasive speciesAnglers can help protect our rivers and streams from invasive speciesText
Aquatic nuisance species
ANS
Fishing
Type:Text
Subject:Aquatic nuisance species
ANS
Fishing
Description:Keep all angling gear free of mud, plants, and organic debris in between each and every use. Unknowingly moving a species from one body of water to another, even within different stretches of the same river, can start a domino effect of invasion, causing irreversible ecological damage. It is especially important to keep waders clean [show more]
ANS boat interdictionsANS boat interdictionsTextAquatic nuisance species
ANS
Boating
Inspections
Zebra mussels
Quagga mussels
Fact sheet
Type:Text
Subject:Aquatic nuisance species
ANS
Boating
Inspections
Zebra mussels
Quagga mussels
Fact sheet
Description:Colorado Parks and Wildlife coordinates a broad multijurisdictional watercraft inspection and decontamination network to protect waters from invasive zebra and quagga mussels and other invasive species. Recreational watercraft is the main vector of introduction for this harmful invader. Colorado is a headwater state and there are no mussels upstream. State certified inspectors repeatedly intercept watercraft infested with mussels. [show more]
ANS fact sheetANS fact sheetTextAquatic nuisance species
ANS
Boating
Inspections
Zebra mussels
Quagga mussels
Type:Text
Subject:Aquatic nuisance species
ANS
Boating
Inspections
Zebra mussels
Quagga mussels
Description:The State Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) Act was signed into law May 2008. The Act defines ANS as exotic or nonnative aquatic wildlife or any plant species that have been determined to pose a significant threat to the aquatic resources or water infrastructure of the state. The Parks Board passed regulations required by the Act on February 20, 2009 and updated them since that time. The regulations require mandatory watercraft inspection, and if necessary, decontamination of all boats coming from out of state, leaving waters with known ANS and boats entering high-risk waters where inspections are required by the managing entity. The focus of the program is to prevent zebra and quagga mussels and other ANS from infesting Colorado’s water resources and threatening our water storage and distribution systems for municipal, industrial and agricultural use. The Colorado ANS Program is highly effective and a model which other states across the nation are learning from. [show more]
ANS tips for boats with ballast tanksANS tips for boats with ballast tanksTextAquatic nuisance species
ANS
Boating
Type:Text
Subject:Aquatic nuisance species
ANS
Boating
Description:Some wakeboard boats, ski boats and sailboats have ballast tanks which are filled with water to stabilize the boat and allow them to ride lower in the water. Many ballast tanks can’t be visually checked, and many cannot be fully drained.
Applying the transtheoretical model of change to legacy planning decisionsApplying the transtheoretical model of change to legacy planning decisionsTextDecision-making
Forest landowners
Behavior change model

Landowner behavior
Type:Text
Subject:Decision-making
Forest landowners
Behavior change model

Landowner behavior
Description:Approximately 1.2 million family forest landowners (FFOs) manage nearly 37 million acres of forestland in five New England states. This means that efforts to sustain and conserve forests in the region are contingent upon short- and long-term management decisions of these owners. We applied the transtheoretical model of behavior change to understand which activities and behaviors FFOs have pursued in relation to forest legacy planning. We conducted a regional mail survey of 2500 FFOs across Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New York. Findings indicate that the majority of FFOs are preparing for or are currently engaging in beginning-level legacy planning decisions while few are thinking about nor planning for more advanced-level decisions. Findings from three stepwise multiple regression models also provide support for predicting a substantive amount of variance in FFOs’ decisions to engage in beginning-level and conservation-oriented planning decisions. [show more]