Columbian sharp-tailed grouse reproductive ecology and chick survival in restored grasslands of Northwest Colorado

Columbian sharp-tailed grouse reproductive ecology.pdf

Dublin Core

Title

Columbian sharp-tailed grouse reproductive ecology and chick survival in restored grasslands of Northwest Colorado

Description

Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) populations have declined across their range and now occupy <10% of their historic range. Habitat loss, degradation, and fragmentation are key factors contributing to their range contraction. The start of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and establishment of mineland reclamation habitat requirements have contributed to the stabilization of some subpopulations by creating more available habitat, particularly for the breeding, nesting, and brood-rearing seasons. In Colorado these 2 restored habitats, largely on private lands, are important for sustaining sharp-tailed grouse stability in the local population. There is concern about loss of these habitats as CRP plantings age and contracts expire, mineland reclamation is released from bond, and landowners or land use priorities change.

Creator

Barker, Rachel E.

Subject

Wildlife Ecology
Columbian sharp-tailed grouse
Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus
Populations

Extent

204 pages

Date Created

2019

Type

Text

Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Publisher

University Of Wisconsin-Madison

Citation

Barker, Rachel E., “Columbian sharp-tailed grouse reproductive ecology and chick survival in restored grasslands of Northwest Colorado,” CPW Digital Collections, accessed August 11, 2022, https://cpw.cvlcollections.org/items/show/120.