Development of landscape scale resource selection models using interpolated layers from micro-scale vegetation measurements in North Park, Colorado

TerrestrialSpecConserv--DevModelsVegMeasurements, NoPark, 2015.pdf

Dublin Core

Title

Development of landscape scale resource selection models using interpolated layers from micro-scale vegetation measurements in North Park, Colorado

Description

State agencies have long used micro-scale vegetation measurements to assess relationships between species and how they chose their habitat. Often species select small scale habitat based on vegetation structure, the height and density of certain vegetation, and the availability of forage species. With the onset of remote sensing and the ability to predict species’ distributions based on relatively easy and inexpensive methods, micro-scale measurements have had reduced value when describing a species’ habitat selection. There is also the problem of how to translate micro-scale measurements at a small scale to landscape level resource selection models. There is a long history of using interpolation methods to predict vegetation characteristics across space, but these predictive surfaces have rarely been applied to spatial models of species habitat.

Creator

Rice, Mindy B.

Subject

Wildlife management
Wildlife habitat improvement

Extent

4 pages

Date Created

2015

Type

Text

Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Is Part Of

Cost Center 3420 Avian Research. Work Package 0663 Terrestrial species conservation

Collection

Citation

Rice, Mindy B., “Development of landscape scale resource selection models using interpolated layers from micro-scale vegetation measurements in North Park, Colorado,” CPW Digital Collections, accessed August 11, 2022, https://cpw.cvlcollections.org/items/show/158.